The Nature’s Head composting toilet review – does it really live up to all the hype?

The Nature’s Head composting toilet is one of the most popular models out on the market right now. Tiny house owners absolutely love them, and for good reason too. You’d be hard-pressed to find a better option at a similar price point.

Dimensions

One of the most important things to consider when buying a composting toilet (or any appliance for that matter) is how much space you’ve got, and how much space you’re willing to fill.

The Nature’s Head dimensions are as follows:

  • 20 inches tall
  • 17 3/4 inches front to rear
  • 19 inches at its widest
  • 13 inches wide at the base
  • 16 1/4 inches wide at the seat
Pocket Tape Measure - Lee Valley Tools

Its tight, efficient compactness is one of the biggest reasons why tiny house owners love to use the Nature’s Head so much. It’s also an excellent choice for boats and RVs (make sure you’ve sealed the mounting brackets from the bilge if you’ve got a wet bath). 

Extras and upgrade options

Nature’s Head offers a whole host of extra add-ons and upgrade options to fully customize your composting toilet to suit your individual wants, needs, and expectations.

These extras cost between fifty cents and a few hundred dollars each, so there’s always options within everybody’s price ranges.

  • 12V Wall Transformers (AC Adapters)
  • Extra Liquids Bottles
  • 3-inch Mushroom Ventilators
  • Filters
  • PVC Screened Vent Assemblies for Structures
  • Shell Vent Assemblies
  • Solids Bin Lids
  • Extra Venting Hoses (sold per foot)
  • Bottle Caps
  • Fuses
  • Vent Hose Ends
  • Fuse Housings
  • Extra Bases (lids included)

NATURE’S HEAD COMPOSTING TOILET

Best Overall
NATURE’S HEAD COMPOSTING TOILET
9.2/10 Our Score

Includes:

  • Normal ventilation hose
  • 12-volt power hook-up
  • Either the shifter or the spider handle 
  • Coconut coir and sphagnum peat moss
  • 1 Nature’s Head Toilet Unit

Pros:

  • Easy to install and use
  • Space efficient 
  • Reliable for off-grid livestyles
  • Durable
  • Odorless

Cons:

  • The urine bottle is transaparent
  • It can get abit clunky 
  • Needs periodical emptying 

Once you’ve installed your Nature’s Head composting toilet, it’s completely self-contained and easy to use. All you’ve got to do is hook up a simple 12-volt fan vent and you’re good to go and start composting.

Nature’s Head themselves claim that the toilet is good for around 90 uses before needing to be emptied, so you can do the math on that and figure out how long you can let it go before emptying it out. Just never let it sie above the crank, no matter how many uses you think you’ve got left.

What we typically think of as sewage smell is the result of liquid and solid waste being mixed together and festering there. The Nature’s Head composting toilet is specifically designed in such a way to separate the two types of waste and mitigate any potential sewage smells. 

Highlighted features

You could write a book about all the features that the Nature’s Head brings to the table. There’s a reason it’s one of the most popular models out on the market right now, after all. 

Self-containment and ease of use

Once you’ve installed your Nature’s Head composting toilet, it’s completely self-contained and easy to use. All you’ve got to do is hook up a simple 12-volt fan vent and you’re good to go and start composting.

Made in America

The Story Behind the American Flag

Not only will you be doing your bit to save the planet as you take another step towards sustainability, but you’ll be helping to provide ethical jobs to Americans so they don’t have to work for the larger corporations who are actively working towards destroying it.

Large capacity

The large waste capacity of the Nature’s Head composting toilet allows you to save time by not dumping it out and emptying it multiple times a day.

Cleaning out and emptying even the cleanest and highest end toilets aren’t exactly a joy to do, so any time you can save from it is a good thing.

Because the Nature’s Head composting toilet splits the waste into two parts (solid and liquid) and people produce varying amounts of waste, defining actual capacity in uses is a difficult task.

On average, however, you can expect to empty out your liquid waste about 5 times per month (once every 3-4 days), while solid waste is good for roughly 90 uses (typically this works out to 2-4 months for most people).

Odorless

What we typically think of as sewage smell is the result of liquid and solid waste being mixed together and festering there. The Nature’s Head composting toilet is specifically designed in such a way to separate the two types of waste and mitigate any potential sewage smells. 

Using the toilet and emptying its bottle

Physically emptying out the bottle is one of the biggest turn offs to composting toilets in general, and the Nature’s Head is no exception. But, when done properly, it doesn’t have to be much of a chore at all.

How to know when the bottle’s full

One of the most important things to not get wrong when using a composting toilet is not letting it get too full before disposing of the waste build up. If you let things build up too much, then you’re going to have a much harder time turning it over.

How often does it need to be emptied

The answer to emptying your Nature’s Head composting toilet is a rather simple one. You’ve just got to empty it when it’s full. This will all depend on how many people you’ve got in your household using the toilet, and how often they’ll actually be using it.

These numbers vary greatly from family to family and what type of household you’re running (is it a tiny house, normal house, or perhaps an RV), so you’ve got to figure out what works best for you and go from there.

Solid waste

Ideally, you want to wait as long as possible to empty out your Nature’s Head composting toilet. This is because it takes time for the solid waste to decompose and liquify. The longer you wait, the easier the job will be.

No flush needed: how to make the simplest DIY compost toiletLow impact  living info, training, products & services

Nature’s Head themselves claim that the toilet is good for around 90 uses before needing to be emptied, so you can do the math on that and figure out how long you can let it go before emptying it out. Just never let it sie above the crank, no matter how many uses you think you’ve got left.

A lot of boaters will even go as far as to leave their solid waste in the toilet over the winter (when it’s put away in storage and closed down for the season) and then empty it out the following spring.

And while this isn’t possible for every situation, many users find that even waiting a week makes a substantial difference in the decomposition.

Liquid waste

Every 3-4 days it should be around time to empty out your liquid waste container. Of course this all depends on how many people they’re using it and how often they are, but 3-4 days is a good rule of thumb.

Disposing of the liquids

Getting rid of all your liquid waste is a relatively simple process. All you’ve got to is dump the contents down your shower drain (this can even work in an RV park once you’re connected to their sewer system).

If you’re on your own property, however, there is another option if you choose to take it. You could dilute the urine over time and use it to water your grass. Nitrogen is generally good for lawns when used in moderation.

Composting material

When you go to buy your composting material there are two options that stick out above the rest: coconut coir and sphagnum peat moss. You can’t really go wrong with either, so, again it’s really just a matter of preference.

Brown Coconut Husk Fiber, For Mattress, Rope, Rs 120 /kilogram K.O.B. Coir  Industry | ID: 14855390230

What really matters is what you do after you’ve bought your material. Before you put it into the composting section of your toilet, throw it into a separate bucket and add some (but not too much) water into the mixture to make the material wet and break it up a bit.

Once you’ve done that, just pour it all into the composting section of your toilet and you’re good to go.

For either option, however, there’s no need to buy and add any additives to it (think nutriments and the like). Always avoid mixing in or using soil from the outside to fill your solid compartment, as it will attract unwanted bugs and worms to your toiletry area.

What you get when you buy a Nature’s Head Composting Toilet

When you buy a Nature’s Head composting toilet, you get more than just a cardboard box with the composter itself. They get everything together so you don’t have to.

You get everything you will need in order to get your system up and running so you don’t have to waste your valuable time searching for extra essential parts before you can start using it.

Nature’s Head prides themselves on letting you hit the ground running and doing the things you love.

Shifter and Spider Handles

When you buy a Nature’s Head composting toilet you’re given the option to have either the shifter handle or the spider one. The shifter handle operates by going back and forth, while the spider is rotated by using either your hand or foot.

Nature's Head Composting Toilet | Nature's Head Australia

Neither handle option is better, per se. They both work exceptionally well, just different. You can look on their website for pictures and video tutorials to see which one will work the best for your individual situation.

Ventilation and fans

Nature’s Head composting toilets provide fans and ventilation systems (as well as opportunities to upgrade both) in order to help move any smells that arise away from the toilet and towards wherever you’d prefer them to be.

Nature’s Head provides buyers with a one normal ventilation hose and a 12-volt power hook-up for a standard, small computer type fan.

Nature’s Head vs. Air Head Composting Toilet

We’ve compared the Nature’s Head with the other leading composting toilet on the market today – the Air Head. Which one will come out on top? Find out in our Nature’s Head vs. Air Head article.

Check out our Newsletter for occasional updates and fresh ideas.